Archive for December, 2006

Nuphar lutea (L.) Yellow Pond Lily

Sunday, December 24th, 2006

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This Yellow Pond Lily resides in the water gardens at the NC Botanical Garden. Photographed in September, 2006.

Kniphofia uvaria (L.) Red Hot Poker

Sunday, December 24th, 2006

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Lots of red hot pokers in the world. This one lives in the NC Botanical Garden. Photographed in September, 2006.

Carphephorus

Sunday, December 24th, 2006

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Not sure exactly what kind of Carphephorus this one is, but it sure is bright. Photographed in late September, 2006 in the Croatan National Forest.

I expect someone will write in to let me know what it is exactly, but if you want to try your hand at an ID start here.

Black and White Forest

Friday, December 22nd, 2006

This August, during a visit to Tater Hill Bog, just outside of West Jefferson, I headed up the hill and into the woods with a couple of botanists in search of a seep. It was an eerie place with large boulders and lots of moss, lichen and various other growth affixed to the trees and rocks.

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Seep areas around Tater Hill. Photographed in black and white early August, 2006.

Solstice

Thursday, December 21st, 2006


7:22 p.m.  Eastern Standard Time
Spring is just around the corner.
From the Naval Observatory:

The Sun reaches his southernmost excursion among the stars on the 21st at 7:22 pm EST. At this moment the center of Old Sol’s disc stands directly above the Tropic of Capricorn about 650 miles (1000 kilometers) south of Pago-Pago in the South Pacific Ocean. The Sun will seem to hover at this latitude for a time, then gradually begin its inexorable northward trek toward the summer solstice half a year from now. Even though we experienced the year’s earliest sunset on the night of the 7th, the latest sunrise won’t occur until the first week of January. If we measure the length of time between sunrise and sunset on the 21st, we would indeed find it to be the year’s shortest day, with the Sun above the horizon for a mere 9 hours 26 minutes here in Washington. Alert skywatchers may have already noticed that sunset is starting to occur later than it did back on the 7th. On the solstice itself the Sun will set four minutes later than it did two weeks ago.

More at the Royal Observatory, Greennwich 

Dionaea muscipula Ellis Venus flytrap

Thursday, December 21st, 2006

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Photographed in late September in the Croatan National Forest in an area that had been burned in the late spring.

Gentiana autumnalis L. pine barren gentian

Thursday, December 21st, 2006

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Photographed in late September, 2006 in the Croatan National Forest tagging along with the North Carolina Native Plant Society.

Additional information:
USDA Plant Database
• Short Essay: In the Land of Fire

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